Extremism

Since 2010, when the Government published the Prevent Strategy, there has been an awareness of the specific need to safeguard children, young people and families from violent extremism. There have been several occasions both locally and nationally in which extremist groups have attempted to radicalise vulnerable children and young people to hold extreme views including views justifying political, religious, sexist or racist violence, or to steer them into a rigid and narrow ideology that is intolerant of diversity and leaves them vulnerable to future radicalisation. The school works closely with Sean Thomson, the Citizenship and Cohesion Advisor for Waltham Forest on 020 8496 3447/07970 769 073.

Frederick Bremer School values freedom of speech and the expression of beliefs / ideology as fundamental rights underpinning our society’s values. Both pupils and teachers have the right to speak freely and voice their opinions.

However, freedom comes with responsibility and free speech that is designed to manipulate the vulnerable or that leads to violence and harm of others goes against the moral principles in which freedom of speech is valued. Free speech is not an unqualified privilege; it is subject to laws and policies governing equality, human rights, community safety and community cohesion.

The current threat from terrorism in the United Kingdom may include the exploitation of vulnerable people, to involve them in terrorism or in activity in support of terrorism. The normalisation of extreme views may also make children and young people vulnerable to future manipulation and exploitation. Frederick Bremer School is clear that this exploitation and radicalisation should be viewed as a safeguarding concern.

Frederick Bremer School seeks to protect children and young people against the messages of all violent extremism including, but not restricted to, those linked to Islamist ideology, or to Far Right / Neo Nazi / White Supremacist ideology, Irish Nationalist and Loyalist paramilitary groups, and extremist Animal Rights movements.

Risk reduction

The school governors, the Head Teacher and the Designated Safeguarding Lead will assess the level of risk within the school and put actions in place to reduce that risk. Risk assessment may include consideration of the school’s RE curriculum, SEND policy, assembly content, the use of school premises by external agencies, integration of pupils by gender and SEN, anti-bullying policy and other issues specific to the school’s profile, community and philosophy.

Response

Our school, like all others, is required to identify a Prevent Single Point of Contact who will be the lead within the organisation for safeguarding in relation to protecting individuals from radicalisation and involvement in terrorism: this will normally be the Designated Safeguarding Lead. The staff member who is responsible for this area for Frederick Bremer School is Emma Hillman/Neil Larkin and is supported by Sam Bullen.

 

When any member of staff has concerns that a pupil may be at risk of radicalisation or involvement in terrorism, they should speak with the staff member who is responsible for this area and to the Designated Safeguarding Lead if this is not the same person and record the concerns in CPOMS.

 

Numerous factors can contribute to and influence the range of behaviours that are defined as violent extremism, but most young people do not become involved in extremist action. For this reason the appropriate interventions in any particular case may not have any specific connection to the threat of radicalisation, for example they may address mental health, relationship or drug/alcohol issues.

Extremism Presentation for Pupils